Change in the Weather

Link

  • A remote Hawaiian island, East Island, was destroyed by Hurricane Walaka. East Island was 11 acres. It was also a key refuge for turtles and seals. Read more in The Guardian.
  • Maersk has sent a ship, the Venta Maersk, through the Northern Passage. The journey and its significance were outlined by the Washington Post, with predictions of 23 days (versus 34 to sail via Suez). In reality, it took 37 days, according to the press release, “without incident.” The idea that there’s a sailable Northern Passage is astounding, even if a first sailing took longer than expected.

CVE Funding and Process

Link

I had not seen this interesting letter (August 27, 2018) from the House Energy and Commerce Committee to DHS about the nature of funding and support for the CVE.

This is the sort of thoughtful work that we hope and expect government departments do, and kudos to everyone involved in thinking about how CVE should be nurtured and maintained.

Space Elevator Test

STAR space elevator
So cool!

STARS-Me (or Space Tethered Autonomous Robotic Satellite – Mini elevator), built by engineers at Shizuoka University in Japan, is comprised of two 10-centimeter cubic satellites connected by a 10-meter-long tether. A small robot representing an elevator car, about 3 centimeters across and 6 centimeters tall, will move up and down the cable using a motor as the experiment floats in space.

Via Science News, “Japan has launched a miniature space elevator,” and “the STARS project.”

Emoji are wierd

So I put a “man shrugging” emoji in my last post; it shows up strangely in RSS as displayed by NetNewsWire, showing “woman shrugging”, the “mars zodiac” sign and a bar code. No idea. Chaos, emergent.

Threat Modeling Thursday: 2018

Since I wrote my book on the topic, people have been asking me “what’s new in threat modeling?” My Blackhat talk is my answer to that question, and it’s been taking up the time that I’d otherwise be devoting to the series.

As I’ve been practicing my talk*, I discovered that there’s more new than I thought, and I may not be able to fit in everything I want to talk about in 50 minutes. But it’s coming together nicely.


The current core outline is:

  • What are we working on
    • The fast moving world of cyber
    • The agile world
    • Models are scary
  • What can go wrong? Threats evolve!
    • STRIDE
    • Machine Learning
    • Conflict

And of course, because it’s 2018, there’s cat videos and emoji to augment logic. Yeah, that’s the word. Augment. 🤷‍♂️

Wednesday, August 8 at 2:40 PM.

* Oh, and note to anyone speaking anywhere, and especially large events like Blackhat — as the speaker resources say: practice, practice, practice.

Half the US population will live in 8 states

In about 20 years, half the population will live in eight states“, and 70% of Americans will live in 15 states. “Meaning 30 percent will choose 70 senators. And the 30% will be older, whiter, more rural, more male than the 70 percent.” Of course, as the census shows the population shifting, the makeup of the House will also change dramatically.

Maybe you think that’s good, maybe you think that’s bad. It certainly leads to interesting political times.

Threat Modeling Thursday: 2018

So this week’s threat model Thursday is simply two requests:

  1. What would you like to see in the series?
  2. What would you like me to cover in my Blackhat talk, “Threat Modeling in 2018?”

“Attacks always get better, and that means your threat modeling needs to evolve. This talk looks at what’s new and important in threat modeling, organizes it into a simple conceptual framework, and makes it actionable. This includes new properties of systems being attacked, new attack techniques (like biometrics confused by LEDs) and a growing importance of threats to and/or through social media platforms and features. Take home ways to ensure your security engineering and threat modeling practices are up-to-date.”

Posted in Uncategorized

Threat Model Thursdays: Crispin Cowan

Over at the Leviathan blog, Crispin Cowan writes about “The Calculus Of Threat Modeling.” Crispin and I have collaborated and worked together over the years, and our approaches are explicitly aligned around the four question frame.

What are we working on?

One of the places where Crispin goes deeper is definitional. He’s very precise about what a security principal is:

A principal is any active entity in system with access privileges that are in any way distinct from some other component it talks to. Corollary: a principal is defined by its domain of access (the set of things it has access to). Domains of access can, and often do, overlap, but that they are different is what makes a security principal distinct.

This also leads to the definition of attack surface (where principals interact), trust boundaries (the sum of the attack surfaces) and security boundaries (trust boundaries for which the engineers will fight). These are more well-defined than I tend to have, and I think it’s a good set of definitions, or perhaps a good step forward in the discussion if you disagree.

What can go wrong?

His approach adds much more explicit description of principals who own elements of the diagram, and several self-check steps (“Ask again if we have all the connections..”) I think of these as part of “did we do a good job?” and it’s great to integrate such checks on an ongoing basis, rather than treating it as a step at the end.

What are we going to do about it?

Here Crispin has assessing complexity and mitigations. Assessing complexity is an interesting approach — a great many vulnerabilities appear on the most complex interfaces, and I think it’s a useful strategy, similar to ‘easy fixes first’ for a prioritization approach.

He also has “c. Be sure to take a picture of the white board after the team is done describing the system.” “d. Go home and create a threat model diagram.” These are interesting steps, and I think deserve some discussion as to form (I think this is part of ‘what are we working on?’) and function. To function, we already have “a threat model diagram,” and a record of it, in the picture of the whiteboard. I’m nitpicking here for two very specific reasons. First, the implication that what was done isn’t a threat model diagram isn’t accurate, and second, as the agile world likes to ask “why are you doing this work?”

I also want to ask, is there a reason to go from whiteboard to Visio? Also, as Crispin says, he’s not simply transcribing, he’s doing some fairly nuanced technical editing, “Collapse together any nodes that are actually executing as the same security principal.” That means you can’t hand off the work to a graphic designer, but you need an expensive security person to re-consider the whiteboard diagram. There are times that’s important. If the diagram will be shown widely across many meetings; if the diagram will go outside the organization, say, to regulators; if the engineering process is waterfall-like.

Come together

Crispin says that tools are substitutes for expertise, and that (a? the?) best practice is for a security expert and the engineers to talk. I agree, this is a good way to do it — I also like to train the engineers to do this without security experts each time.

And that brings me to the we/you distinction. Crispin conveys the four question frame in the second person (What are you doing, what did you do about it), and I try to use the first person plural (we; what are we doing). Saying ‘we’ focuses on collaboration, on dialogue, on exploration. Saying ‘you’ frames this as a review, a discussion, and who knows, possibly a fight. Both of us used that frame at a prior employer, and today when I consult, I use it because I’m really not part of the doing team.

That said, I think this was a super-interesting post for the definitions, and for showing the diagram evolution and the steps taken from a whiteboard to a completed, colored diagram.

The image is the frontspiece of Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes, with its famous model of the state, made up of the people.